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This is what a blocked driveway is like

As a courtesy, I walked up to the car blocking my driveway and tapped on the window. This time though, I was holding so much stuff in my hands—my car keys and three bags (including a bag of laundry), so in that moment, I also accidentally tapped the window with my keys.

The woman in the driver’s seat leapt in surprise. Realizing that it was just me, she rolled down the window. I immediately said tiredly, “I am leaving in a few minutes.”

“You could have just told me! You almost broke my car!”

Stunned, I paused. But then as she rolled up the window, I yelled back, “But you’re blocking my driveway!”

As I stomped down to my car, I knew what was going to happen. I adjusted a few things in my garage and things in my car.
Then suddenly, I saw her back up. Initially, she was only blocking 50% of the driveway, but now she blocked the entire driveway. So I did the only thing that I could do: I drove out and pressed the horn. I knew that this passive aggressive thing was going to happen, but I wasn’t going to go out of my way to be nice. So as I blocked the sidewalk and she blocked my way out, I honked loudly. Pedestrians dressed in their Halloween wear, most likely partially drunk, sauntered by, yelling, “Everyone is just blocking the driveway tonight!”

I wanted to ram her car and she was suggesting me to do it. But I knew exactly what that would entail. So we were not moving. But after 30 seconds, she finally drove off and I followed her. But after about a mile, I gave up and drove to my destination, annoyed and irritated. And realizing that how my impatience has grown as a person who lives in a large city.